Home SportsCricket One-Day Retirement by Quinton de Kock: “Time to Get the Last Top-Up in the T20 League”

One-Day Retirement by Quinton de Kock: “Time to Get the Last Top-Up in the T20 League”

by khushahal vishwakarma
quinton de kock

If I wasn’t really that loyal, I would have done it five years ago when the T20 league actually started,” Quinton de Kock admitted that the lure of money in the T20 league affected his decision to retire from One-Day cricket after this year’s World Cup, as he seeks to “boost” his earnings with his career drawing to a close.

Although the 30-year-old quinton de kock has been playing professional cricket for the past 11 years, he retired from Test cricket almost two years ago and will continue playing T20 cricket in international and leagues worldwide starting with the BBL scheduled to begin in December.

quinton de kock himself made it available for Australia’s competition, even though it will clash with South Africa’s white-ball series against India. And immediately after confronting South Africa’s white-ball series against India, he announced his retirement from ODIs. In an interview before his final domestic one-day match, when asked if the T20 franchise circuit influenced his decision, de Kock confirmed that it did, but he said that his priority was South Africa.

“I won’t sit here and deny it. It helps me in my decision,” he said. “I’ve been playing for about 10 or 11 years, and I’ve tried to keep my loyalty to the team intact, which I think I have. I’ve really tried to represent Proteas well during my career,” he said. “T20 competitions – I won’t deny that there’s a lot of money in it, and when you get to the end of your career, people want to get their last top-up before their career ends.

Any normal person would do that anyway. If I wasn’t really that loyal, I would have done it five years ago when it actually took off. Now I’m getting old, and it’s time with the curve of my career.”

Despite being a dangerous batsman and keeping gloves lightning-fast with 21 months since then, de Kock has played 21 one-dayers and 19 T20 matches for South Africa, making a century in each format and averaging slightly less than his overall figures. He suggested that his changing role in the team – from being a dynamic young player to a senior pro – could have something to do with it.

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“I’ve been around for about 10 or 11 years, and I’ve tried to keep my loyalty to the team intact, which I think I have,” he said. “I’ve really tried to represent Proteas well during my career. That’s changed over time. Somehow, my game has got a little bit better compared to that player who just smashes it all the time.

I’ve learned to play the situation that’s in front of me now. I’ve learned to control senior groups from the guys like David Miller to the senior group – we needed to lead the group. Somehow, through that process, my game has got a little bit better than that player who just smashes it all the time.”

That’s why when asked about his best memories of quinton de kock , they don’t think about his career-best ODI innings – 178 against Australia in 2016 – but rather think about events like his half-century in a Test in goal in 2014. An example of his patience.

“We won a series in Sri Lanka when we won from 0-1, which is never an easy feat for teams outside the subcontinent,” he recalled, and praised his maiden ODI century against Pakistan in Abu Dhabi and three consecutive centuries against India in 2013. That helped him make a name for himself.

“I’ve got a lot of good memories along this road, things you can’t forget,” he said. “Friends know I have an elephant’s memory; I don’t forget. There are some things that I don’t forget. I remember every detail about everything. It’s a skill I’ve developed now.”

It may be that his memory does not find it as enjoyable as being on his domestic field in his last one-day match. He scored 27 runs off 39 balls before getting caught in the slips and stood on his home ground, applauding. It was his 144th match, and in the World Cup, he will play the most 11 matches in his name.

So, what’s next for him apart from playing T20 cricket? “I’ll definitely take an interval of a year, then reevaluate,” he said. “And then, I’ll take another year’s interval and reevaluate. And then, I’ll go back into society and become a normal person.

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